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Why Is The Demand For Online Education Increasing?

Posted by

Leoron press service

Category

INTERVIEWS

Date

November 21, 2019 November 21, 2019

Educational Institutions As Pioneers Of Online Training

Although several decades old, the concept of e-learning is lately making a vigorous breakthrough among professionals. Modern e-learning tools are showing a steady rise in precision and performance. Scholars are given a learning experience that enables them to earn degrees, certificates, and official credentials that signify their knowledge and skills. As such, a rising base of e-lessons is currently accessible to foster the ever-growing need for education.

Coursera, Lynda, Udemy, LinkedIn learning... Microsoft learning? Google training center?! Thousands of classified professionals, self-taught entrepreneurs, growth hackers and digital marketers alike are actively trying to pass hands-on knowledge and industry insights through custom-built online courses. This leads many to believe that the current e-learning craze is a hyped-up millennial trend that holds no real value and is destined to fade out. Backed by the conventional approach of most institutions of higher learning, who have traditionally adopted the classroom-based type of learning, we couldn't be very far from the truth. Except, we are. At least according to stats, facts, and numbers.  And experts! According to Valerie Chatterji, Business Development Manager at Finoit Technologies, a leader in e-learning software development, we’re dead wrong in assuming that reputable institutes of higher education aren’t willing to make the transition to e-learning. We took the liberty of asking Valerie for her opinion on this issue and this is what we discovered: “Educational institutions used to be pioneers in online training, powered by national initiatives and funds. Now we see a great trend of rising demand in the business training area, supported by globalization and time-to-market shortening competitive strategies.”

A Growing Number Of Advanced Scholars In Developing Countries

To one’s surprise, online learning isn’t just a western trend. The current wave has been affecting developing at a fast pace.  An article by Uthman T. Alturki PhD, who is responsible for Educational Computing and Online Learning at King Saud University, suggests that the history of distance learning in Saudi Arabia goes way back. In fact, Saudi correspondence programs can be tracked to the beginning of the 50s. In the same vein, correspondence’s digital counterpart - online learning, is striking at full speed. But the Arab world has opened the doors to the great online learning flood in more than just higher education. The corporate world is rapidly digesting the perks of technology-assisted education. 

E-learning coordinator at LEORON Professional Development Institute, Agron Kurtishi, shares some powerful insights on the trajectory of e-learning in corporate circles.

“It breaks such barriers as time and geographical location. It’s feasible and productive. We train around 1.000 professionals around the world through our online solutions and professionals around the globe are widely embracing this method in addition to classroom-based learning. Truth be told, it is a tight competition, because its rising popularity has put competitors on the run and online is becoming the next trend in the Middle East.”

A conclusion also backed-up by Mrs. Valerie of Finoit technologies:

“Online learning plays a pivotal role in breaking this obstacle of time and space as it aims at reducing cost, time and manpower investment into running training programs and engaging a huge list of candidates, be it in schools, colleges or at an enterprise level.”

How Credible Is Online Learning?

Yet, skepticism remains. Old school scholars and academics alike are eager to question e-learning’s credibility, judging by the premise that its rise in popularity should solely be attributed to the financial feasibility. With conventional education prices skyrocketing annually, online learning has indeed often caught the attention of those on a budget. Nonetheless, this assertion should be disregarded. As stated in the aforementioned article by Uthman T. Alturki PhD, and confirmed by this not-so-recent observation by The Observatory, a higher education thinktank with institutional members across 30 countries, e-learning achieves tp facilitate a big number of students that are emerging in developing countries. Students that would otherwise suffer the consequences of not being systematized. Conversely, head of e-business in Croatia’s HSM Informatika, Goran Pecarina, who has been helping corporations, governments and higher education institutions in the Balkans establish their online suits through Adobe’s Connect, points out to much more than price reduction when choosing e-learning.

“Financial efficiency is a strong driver for online learning, but not the only one.  Reach digital content, simple user access and improved user experience definitely drive online learning ubiquity. Online learning is widely embraced as an effective addition to traditional learning. And this directly improves learning acceptance and achievement. We see online learning not to replace the traditional learning method, but rather to improve it by adding powerful digital channel, providing modern hybrid learning.”

Although several decades old, the concept of e-learning is lately making a vigorous breakthrough among professionals. Modern e-learning tools are showing a steady rise in precision and performance. Scholars are given a learning experience that enables them to earn degrees, certificates, and official credentials that signify their knowledge and skills. As such, a rising base of e-lessons is currently accessible to foster the ever-growing need for education.

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